Category: My Collection

My personal carnivorous plant collection.

Sarracenia Adrian Slack x Judith Hindle by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia in the full swing of Spring!

Hey everyone, thanks for checking out my Venus flytraps in the full swing of Spring last week! As promised, here’s the Sarracenia’s spring show!

This is especially exciting for me, because I got many new Sarrs later last year, just as they started to go dormant. So this is the first time I’m seeing their spring growth!

Sarracenia do like to take their sweet time putting out flowers first, then pitchers. It’s an awful tease that lasts like two months!

Sarracenia North American pitcher plant flower by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s the flower of one of my classic beauties, Judith Hindle x flava var. atropurpurea.

Sarracenia North American pitcher plant flower by The Carnivore Girl

Fully opened! I love the veins on the petals and that gorgeous range of colors!

Sarracenia North American pitcher plant flower by The Carnivore Girl

Just for fun, here’s a shot of the flower from last year:

The flower of a carnivorous North American pitcher plant. (Sarracenia Judith Hindle x flava var. atropurpurea.)

 

I’ve had Sarracenia oreophila x purpurea for the same length of time as Judith Hindle x flava atro, but this is the first time I’ve seen it flower. Looks like the petals have been painted with a watercolor brush!

Sarracenia North American pitcher plant flower by The Carnivore Girl

And the first oreophila x purp pitchers! Ah, how I’ve missed you!

Sarracenia oreophila x purpurea by The Carnivore Girl

 

Like usual, my regular purpurea was one of the first to pitcher. I love a fresh purp pitcher!

Sarracenia purpurea by The Carnivore Girl

Here’s another lovely purp hybrid (Leah Wilkerson x Brunswick Beauty) that I enjoy seeing the fresh details before it matures and goes super dark.

sarracenia-pitcher-plant-purpurea-hybrid-1

Here’s a more mature pitcher, to compare how much it darkens.

Sarracenia x moorei x purpurea hybrids make some beautiful ruffled hoods!
Sarracenia ‘Leah Wilkerson’ x ‘Brunswick Beauty’

Sarracenia flava “Extreme Red Throat” is freshly opening and showing off that distinctive marking already!

Sarracenia flava "Extreme Red Thoat" by The Carnivore Gril

 

Flava x catesbaei has some gorgeous fresh coloring too!

Sarracenia flava x catesbaei by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia flava x catesbaei by The Carnivore Girl

 

Early this year, I bought plants from the one and only Mike Wang, who was amazing enough to send me a Leah Wilkerson x Adrian Slack!!!! Not enough exclamation points!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It was one of the first pitchers to emerge, and is currently the tallest. I’m estimating it’s close to two feet tall. The rhizome isn’t even that big! Just a super stunning plant. I can’t wait to see how it grows throughout the season.

Sarracenia Leah Wilkerson x Adrian Slack by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia Leah Wilkerson x Adrian Slack by The Carnivore Girl
Sarracenia Leah Wilkerson x Adrian Slack by The Carnivore Girl

 

Sarracenia Leah Wilkerson x Adrian Slack by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia Leah Wilkerson x Adrian Slack by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia Leah Wilkerson x Adrian Slack by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia Leah Wilkerson x Adrian Slack by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s another stunner from Mike. This one is Adrian Slack x Judith Hindle (man, those two get around, am I right?? :P)

Sarracenia Adrian Slack x Judith Hindle by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia Adrian Slack x Judith Hindle by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia Adrian Slack x Judith Hindle by The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia Adrian Slack x Judith Hindle by The Carnivore Girl

I am just slightly mesmerized by this hood. Don’t mind me.

Sarracenia Adrian Slack x Judith Hindle by The Carnivore Girl

 

Thank you all for looking! These are my best looking Sarracenia at the moment. The leucophyllas, minors, and other hybrids are coming up slower, but will likely have their own post in the next few weeks. Stay tuned!

If you were as mesmerized by the plants as I am, please feel free to share this post via the buttons to the left! I super appreciate it. 🙂

Thanks again, catch y’all next time!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Venus flytraps in the full swing of Spring!

Hi, everyone! It’s been a little while since I’ve blogged. March was a fairly hectic month, but I’ve got lots on blog calendar for you in the coming months! 🙂

First up: Let’s check out the Venus flytraps! They’ve been putting out sweet traps for over a month already.

Fused Tooth is making typical-looking traps right now. In my experience, they fuse toward the end of the season.

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Those pink cilia, though!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Also feeding themselves for the first time in months, and biting off more than they can chew.

Fused Tooth Venus flytrap by The Carnivore Girl

Here’s the same plant last summer when I first got it:

Fused Tooth Venus flytrap by The Carnivore Girl

 

And last fall. Fully fused goodness!

Fused Tooth Venus flytrap by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s a pot of young typical flytraps putting out good growth and coloring up nicely!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s Bristletooth, just looking sexy!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s a freaky looking one, but can you believe it’s Justina Davis?? I know! These came out of tissue culture, which may have given it these freaky traits! Interesting how even cloned cultivars can look very different from each other.
Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s one of my new favorites, FTS  Werewolf Spawn! I still intend on getting the original Werewolf one day, but right now I’m enjoying the hell out of this puppy (hehe!).
Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

FTS Maroon Monster is looking dark, sexy, and mean! I’m seriously considering entering this baby into the BACPS show this year.

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Speaking of sexy and mean, DC XL is looking that way too! This is still a young plant, and it’s making average adult sized traps already (about an inch or so long).

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Pink Venus is my other most impressive looking all-red Venus flytrap lately! The all-red ones seem to grow a bit behind their greener siblings.

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

And lastly, FTS Crimson Sawtooth, my all-red pride and joy, is not far behind!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

You may remember most of my flytraps suffering from a mite attack last summer, so I’m watching like a hawk for those bastards. The plants looking healthy and strong this year, so hopefully they stay that way!

Thanks a bunch for looking! I hope all your plants are looking great right now too. In the next blog post, I’ll have a ton of Sarracenia photos! Those came out of dormancy a bit later than the flytraps, and they’re finally opening for business and looking stellar.

Any questions or comments on the flytraps, please leave a comment below! Catch you all next time!

Mexican butterwort Pinguicula 'Weser' with flower stalk.

Signs of Spring + Special Announcement!

Spring is technically one month away, but my area is feeling her warmth and light right now. As of writing this, it’s a perfect 78 F outside!

These few weeks before the spring equinox for me is full of anticipation, an eager feeling of tension. It’s like watching a movie for that one big moment you don’t want to miss.

Read more

Maria, owner of TheCarnivoreGirl.com

2015 in Review: My First Full Year of Plant Blogging!

And we’re at the end of another year! What a fun, plant-filled year it was. I enjoyed looking back while doing my 2014 Year in Review post exactly one year ago, so why not make it a tradition? Here’s a quick recap of  adventures in 2015! Make sure you read through the end… I have some big news to kick off 2016!

Read more

Mexican butterwort (pinguicula). A beautiful, delicate carnivorous plant that becomes a succulent in the winter! Click for more info!

Pings & Pygmies! Who’s the cutest of them all?

As the ‘Merican carnivores (Sarracenia and Dionaea, namely) prepare for another dormancy season, some other plants are looking their best!

Mexican butterwort (pinguicula). A beautiful, delicate carnivorous plant that becomes a succulent in the winter! Click for more info!
Pinguicula ‘Pirouette’

I’ve never seen my pings (pinguicula) grow so fast and make such nice color before! It took me a long time to find a spot they were really happy with. My current space is great for full sun or full shade, but not much room in between. But I seemed to have found a sweet spot for pings! Here they get some direct light in the morning and shade for the rest of the day.

Mexican butterwort (pinguicula). A beautiful, delicate carnivorous plant that becomes a succulent in the winter! Click for more info!
P. laueana. I can’t wait until this one flowers!

 

Mexican butterwort (pinguicula). A beautiful, delicate carnivorous plant that becomes a succulent in the winter! Click for more info!
P. esseriana lookin’ super cute!

 

Mexican butterwort (pinguicula). A beautiful, delicate carnivorous plant that becomes a succulent in the winter! Click for more info!
P. agnata x moranensis staying pretty green, but still looking good!

 

Mexican butterwort (pinguicula). A beautiful, delicate carnivorous plant that becomes a succulent in the winter! Click for more info!
My other P. ‘Pirouette’.

 

Mexican butterwort (pinguicula). A beautiful, delicate carnivorous plant that becomes a succulent in the winter! Click for more info!
P. ‘Weser’. The biggest and most impressive in the collection.

The only pinguicula not looking great is my P. gigantea.

Mexican butterwort (pinguicula). A beautiful, delicate carnivorous plant that becomes a succulent in the winter! Click for more info!

I suspect browning heart disease (click at the bottom of the page), as the plant appeared to rot from the center outward. However, two plantlets are growing from this one leaf, so I’m cautiously optimistic for the future! Maybe these babies will live up to their name one day!

And now onto the pygmy Drosera!

Pygmy sundews are tiny carnivorous plants! Adorable, yet deadly! Click to learn more!

Winter is the growing season for pygmy sundews. Why is this? The only explanation I’m able to come up with is they’re Australian and everything is backwards down under. 😉

They do still love lots of light, so mine have been pretty happy over the summer. As long as you keep them wet during the summer months, they won’t go dormant and don’t need to!

Soon they’ll begin producing gemmae, their tiny modified leaves that can be removed and sown like seeds. Gemmae will produce clones of the parent plant. I have a feeling my winter will be busy with lots of pygmy propagation!

Pygmy sundews are tiny carnivorous plants! Adorable, yet deadly! Click to learn more!

 

My first pygmy sundew was Drosera omissa x pulchella, which I sowed from gemmae in a trade. And it’s really the perfect first pygmy. They get BIG for pygmy sundews and are extremely vigorous growers.

Look at how tiny and sparse these little guys used to be!

Drosera omissa x pulchella. Pygmy sundews are easiest to propagate through gemmae, which act like seeds but are reproductive bodies that create clones of the plant.
Drosera omissa x pulchella gemmae. My first pygmy drosera!

Pygmy sundew Drosera omissa x pulchella. Tiny, adorable, and easy to grow!

Pygmy sundew Drosera omissa x pulchella. Tiny, adorable, and easy to grow!

 

And look at them now! Same pot, nine months later.

Pygmy sundews are tiny carnivorous plants! Adorable, yet deadly! Click to learn more!

 

Pygmy sundews are tiny carnivorous plants! Adorable, yet deadly! Click to learn more!

Pygmy sundews are tiny carnivorous plants! Adorable, yet deadly! Click to learn more!

 

Drosera scorpioides is getting big and tall, too. Also sown from gemmae acquired from one of my main sundew dealers, Devon of Sundews Etc.

Pygmy sundews are tiny carnivorous plants! Adorable, yet deadly! Click to learn more!

These guys are also one of the bigger of the pygmies and grow a crazy stem! The tallest of these is about 2 inches high.

Pygmy sundews are tiny carnivorous plants! Adorable, yet deadly! Click to learn more!

 

So who wins the battle of cuteness, pings or pygmies? I just can’t decide, but I suppose that’s why I have both! Do you have a preference of pinguicula or pygmy Drosera? Let me know in a comment!

And thanks for reading! Catch ya next time!

Zombie herbivorous dinosaurs in a carnivorous plant garden!

Dinosaurs in the Garden & New Carnivorous Plant Projects!

Yes, you read right. Dinosaurs in the garden! Zombie herbivorous dinosaurs, to be exact!

Zombie herbivorous dinosaurs in a carnivorous plant garden!
Zombie stegosaurus wondering if Venus flytrap is edible!

 

Zombie herbivorous dinosaurs in a carnivorous plant garden!
Don’t remember what this dino is called, but it’s got a taste for sundews! (D. coccicaulus ‘alba’, D. hamiltonii, and D. collinsiae)

The dinosaurs were like 20 cents in a clearance bin at the grocery store, so I had to adopt them into my carnivorous little carnival!

These dinos also made me realize I haven’t done a real photo session in a while, so here’s a few recent shots for you all!

Sarracenia alata ‘Maroon Throat’ seemed to struggle earlier this year, but has finally been throwing up some nice pitchers!

Sarracenia alata "Maroon Throat"

Sarracenia alata "Maroon Throat"

 

This unknown Sarracenia hybrid from Cook’s Carnivores (read my review here!) really needs dividing! It’s grown pitchers as least twice as big as last year and lots more growth points. It also apparently got drunk because it threw up a flower super late in the season. I was hoping to self-pollinate it to see what other kind of genes it had, but never saw any pollen in the flower. Winds might have taken it or may have never had any. We’ll find out soon enough!

North American pitcher plant, Sarracenia. Unknown hybrid.

North American pitcher plant, Sarracenia. Unknown hybrid.

Carnivorous plant flower. Sarracenia (North American Pitcher Plant)

 

Also in need of dividing, my Sarracenia oreophila x purpurea parent plant! I love how cute these two pitchers are on it. They look like they’re snuggling!

Sarracenia oreophila x purpurea. Carnivorous pitcher plant.

 

Sarracenia x readii suffered some mealybug damage early in the year, but bounced back and is making some nice pitchers too!

Sarracenia x readii. North American carnivorous pitcher plant.

The crazy veins of S x. ‘Godzuki’!

Sarracenia 'Godzuki'. Carnivorous pitcher plant hybrid.

 

The crazy, flamboyant hood of S. flava x catesbaei!

Sarracenia flava x catesbaei. Carnivorous pitcher plant hybrid.

Sarracenia flava x catesbaei. Carnivorous pitcher plant hybrid.

 

The next couple of months will be REALLY busy for me! I’m in the process of moving my collection to a different (more spacious!) location that will allow me to offer more plants to my fantastic customers next year! Once I complete my set-up in the new space, December will be a long month of dividing, potting, more dividing… and I’m so ready to get my hands dirty!

I’m also taking on a new creative project! Check out the photo below for a tease…

 

Carnivorous plant 2016 calendar. Accepting pre-orders October 1st!

Yes, I’m making carnivorous plant calendars! I’ll be working diligently on them this month and will start accepting pre-orders October 1st! I plan to ship all pre-orders out by November 1st! Plenty of time to get a head-start on your holiday gifts! 😉

The calendar will feature vintage and antique illustrations of carnivorous plants, some of which are also on my products in my Society6 store. And some which have yet to be seen! I’m so excited and inspired to be working on this calendar, and can’t wait to see the final result!

As always, I give my email subscribers first access! Sign up below to make sure you reserve your calendar!

Cute baby mantis hanging out on a Sarracenia flava!

Do your plants have friends, too? Meet the critters on my carnivores!

After growing carnivores for a while, you’ll notice how many insects they attract! Usually these insects are lured in by the plants’ scents and sweet nectar to meet their fate as food.

Others slightly higher up the food chain notice the insect feeding ground and want in on it, too! The unlucky ones become food too, like these unfortunate spiders.

But a few have either the intelligence or adaptations to live peacefully with the carnivores and not become prey themselves. Here’s a few of the smarter critters I’ve found living among the carnivorous for longer than a single day!

This cute baby mantis made its home near the top of my biggest Sarracenia flava var. cuprea pitcher. Nice choice in real estate, little guy (or girl?)! I love mantids! I really wish more of them hung around the garden.

Cute baby mantis hanging out on a Sarracenia flava!

 

I’m not sure what species this white spider is (any entomologists out there know?), but I’ve seen a couple of them hanging out on the Sarracenia. I know jumping spiders are pretty common carnivorous plant companions, but they’re often too small and quick to get a good photo! These guys are bigger and are more into staying still for the camera.

White garden spider

 

Again, not an entomologist, but this little guy was cool-looking! Look at that eye, and the two tails! Perhaps a damselfly or dragonfly nymph?

Interesting fly or nymph of some kind.

 

These orange and black beetles are pretty common around here. I’m not a huge beetle lover like The Beetle Girl, but his face is kinda cute!

Orange and black beetle

 

Snail! Not an insect, and more of a pest than the above critters, but I do have a soft spot for snails. I don’t usually see them on my pots because I keep them off the ground. This one was found under the lip of a water tray, probably trying to escape the rain a while back!

Garden snail

Snails have cute faces too, so I took a couple shots of its eyes extending.

Garden snail Garden snail

 

What kind of visitors do you get hanging around your plants? Are most of them friends or foes? Tell me all about ’em in a comment!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

Special treat! Plants you’ve NEVER seen before + UJB!

Venus flytrap in a thrifted ceramic container. Click to see more!

Time for another special Urban Jungle Bloggers post! With this month’s theme, I took the opportunity to challenge myself and post some plants that haven’t appeared on this blog yet. You may have seen some of these on my Instagram if you follow (hint: you should!).

This month’s UJB theme was #plantcolorpop and what a challenge it was for me! I favor neutral, earthy colors in almost everything, from the backgrounds of my photos to my clothes. My favorite color is green, so I love bits of bright green here and there but overall I’m not a “color pop” type of person!  Still, I welcome a challenge!

For these colorful backgrounds, I used colored cardstock paper I had for making cards and crafting.

Utricularia nelumbifolia was by far my favorite plant with the blue background! This is an epiphytic utricularia from Brazil! Nelumbo is a genus of aquatic plants, most often known as lotuses. The blue really lends that aquatic, lotus-y feel!

Utricularia nelumbifolia, an epiphytic bladderwort with lotus-like leaves. It's also a carnivorous plant!

 

I also shot this typical Venus flytrap on the blue background, but I actually prefer it on the pink background! (Scroll back up to see the first image of this post) That is pretty shocking, as I’m NOT a girl who likes pink at all!

Venus flytrap in a thrifted ceramic container. Click to see more!

 

I liked the contrast between FTS Maroon Monster’s leaves and the greenish yellow background.

FTS Maroon Monster. A large, robust, red cultivar of Venus flytrap.

 

I like how this little flytrap really blends in with the background, but the planter it’s in stands out so strongly! (Psst: Win this plant + tons more in my latest giveaway! Click here!)

Venus flytrap in a thrifted ceramic container. Click to see more!

 

Some of the red Sarracenia looked really nice on a different green background! This one below is a young “Reptilian Rose” (Thanks, Rob!) You can see the hint of a pointy, funky lip on the right pitcher, but these divisions are still a bit small to display those crazy, reptilian traits! Maybe in another year or two, but I do love the red color they’ve become!

Young pitchers of Sarracenia "Reptilian Rose". North American pitcher plant hybrid.

Another young Sarracenia division diggin’ the minty green background! This one is “Lamentations” x  flava red.

Sarracenia flava red x "Lamentations". North American pitcher plant hybrid.

 

FTS Crimson Sawtooth, you are beautiful against any background color. Be still, my heart!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

 

I was genuinely surprised at how many plants actually looked really good against the pink background! Here’s Utricularia livida! You can see the shape of the flower very nicely against the color pop.

Utricularia livida. A carnivorous bladderwort with tiny, delicate flowers. Click to see more!

Utricularia livida. A carnivorous bladderwort with tiny, delicate flowers. Click to see more!

And last but not least, here’s a shot of my smallest Sarracenia “Hummer’s Hammerhead”! I don’t think I’ve shown these guys on the blog since I first got them, and they were all headless. They’ve come a long way since then!

Sarracenia "Hummer's Hammerhead". A North American pitcher plant hybrid.

Thank you for checking out this #plantcolorpop challenge! I hope you enjoyed it. 🙂

Check out the Urban Jungle Blogger community here! Also check out the lovely founders, Judith and Igor.

Which color background did you like best? Let me know in a comment!

Veins on the hood of a Sarracenia pitcher plant hybrid

A Sarracenia Score at the Carnivorous Plant Show & Sale!

Earlier this month, I attended my first ever BACPS Show & Sale, and what a fun time it was! The sales area was packed, and some vendors were pretty low on inventory by the time I arrived.

Phil Faulisi, the Sarracenia breeder who created “Saurus”, and sold it for over $1,000, had a mostly bare table when I walked up, and was marking his remainders at half off. One S. minor hybrid had a sticker that read “FREE”. I asked if it was REALLY free, and Phil said yep! I scooped that one up fast! It’s not one of his creations, but a large and beautiful plant nontheless! I’m happy to accept a master’s breadcrumbs!

Check out the veins and those spots on this beauty!

Veins on the hood of a Sarracenia pitcher plant hybrid

New pitcher forming on Sarracenia minor hybrid

Sarracenia minor hybrid. North American Pitcher Plant.

I also got this adorable Sarracenia “Bug Bat” from Predatory Plants! I’ve seen photos online and didn’t think much of it, but fell in love after seeing it in person! I had no idea it had pink spots (also called windows). And the chubby pitcher shape is just too cute.

Sarracenia "Bug Bat". Carnivorous North American pitcher plant.

Sarracenia "Bug Bat". Carnivorous North American pitcher plant.

Sarracenia "Bug Bat". Carnivorous North American pitcher plant.

 

When I repot for next year, I think I’ll put “Bug Bat” and my “Godzuki” (picture below) in the same pot! Their pitcher forms are pretty similar and I think they’d make a monstrously good duo! 😉

Sarracenia x "Godzuki" Carnivorous North American pitcher plant hybrid.

Back to the show! Mike Wang was also selling plants and I knew I had to buy something from him.  I debated  for a while on his flava var. ornata “Black Veins”, which I’ve been wanting for a long time BUT! I have several flava variations and hybrids at the moment, and wanted to add something different to my collection.

Finally, I remembered I don’t have a huge variety of Sarracenia purpurea, and so bought a big clump of S. montana! The full name and data of this one is Sarracenia montana F1 Transylvania Co., NC.

Sarracenia purpurea var. montana F1 Transylvania Co., NC.

Sarracenia purpurea var. montana F1 Transylvania Co., NC.

Yes, I unpotted the clump and divided it up a bit. I know this is sacrilege to some, but I wanted to get rid of dead leaf matter in the center (don’t want to give potential mealybugs anywhere to hide!). Some of the pitcher were getting squished too, so I wanted to give them room to grow and really inflate.

That’s all I got from the sale! A nice mini-haul, and I’m happy I had some self-control, haha!

Here are some more photos from the event! Look at all those plants for sale!

BAPCS-show-sale-2015 (3 of 9)

 

Phil Faulisi with his mostly bare table. If I had known he could be bribed with good beer, I would’ve come more prepared! 😉 That is an Anderson Valley Bourbon Barrel Stout he’s holding.

BAPCS-show-sale-2015 (1 of 9)

The awesome pygmy sundew garden submitted to the show by Mr. Sundews-etc! Devon took a lot more photos of show than I did, which you can see here! 

Pygmy sundew garden

Sarracenia. North American pitcher plants.

Stunning Nepenthes spectabilis

Pinguicula Pirouette and frog.

Drosera ordensis, a sundew in the Petiolaris-Complex.

Sarracenia. North American pitcher plants.

I was unsure of submitting plants to the show initially, but I definitely plan on submitting at least some flytraps next year! Who knows, maybe I’ll even be crazy enough to have a vendor table next year! We’ll see how things are at The Carnivore Girl HQ at that point. 😉

Thanks for viewing folks! Were you there? What kind of plants did you get? Let me know in a comment!

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

What has 8 legs and is totally delicious? These flytraps will tell you!

Lately I’ve noticed my Venus flytraps catching a lot more spiders than they usually do. The spiders are probably coming in droves thanks to the increase in flies, which (I think) is due to the increase in dog crap sitting on the lawn. Thanks, new neighbors!

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

 

What’s interesting is this trap pictured below re-opened and is ready for business again after eating and digesting this spider. Usually, spider legs hanging out of a trap prevents the trap edges from sealing, meaning the leaf can’t release its digestive juices in order to consume the spider. This usually means the trap leaf will start dying soon after capturing a spider or something else with appendages sticking out.

This is why when hand-feeding your plants, use food that’s 1/3 the size of the trap or smaller. Read my feeding guide to learn more!

Hence why I’m not thrilled about so many spiders being eaten. They make my traps die! But this one looks like it was still able to seal up and do it’s thang with its victim’s final gesture of escape forever immortalized (aren’t I poetic today?).

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

 

Enough gruesome photos for ya? Here are some pretty photos to balance them out! I haven’t shown the all-red Dionaea cultivars in a little while, so check them out below!

Red Venus flytrap cultivar Red Piranha
Dionaea Muscipula “Red Piranha”

 

Red Venus flytrap cultivars Crimson Sawtooth and Pink Venus

I love the juxtaposition of long, eyelashy cilia of Pink Venus next to the short, serrated edges of Crimson Sawtooth (dang, I am on it with the big words today!).

Red Venus flytrap cultivars Red Piranha and Pink Venus

 

I’m ending this post with this photo because I just find the form on this developing leaf so lovely, pure, and flawless. Kind of like a newborn baby! Over time, it’s going to grow up, get marked up and scarred, eat like a king, suffer, and slowly die. But in this moment, it’s just so pure and untouched.

The simple beauty of a Venus flytrap leaf forming

I really have idea why I’m so poetic and sappy in this post today, haha. I’m rushing a bit, so maybe it just comes out of me when under pressure!

Can you believe we’re almost in June already? What’s even better is June is my birthday month! What better time for an amazing new GIVEAWAY? I’m planning it out right now, so enter your email below to get all the details first when it’s live!

Maybe my subconscious realized I’m getting older, and that’s why I’m acting weird. Hah!