Category: Venus fly traps

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show & Sale recap!

And it’s over, just like that! The BACPS show & sale is the most anticipated event of the year for many Nor Cal growers, myself included.

It was great to be a part of the show this year, not just an attendee. I’m already planning for next year! Perhaps a sales table to myself, we will see.

Onto the pictures! I was trying to conserve my camera battery, and so wasn’t able to shoot every awesome plant, but think I got a pretty good sampling!

The Sarracenia selection couldn’t be beat!

Sarracenia table. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia table. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

I briefly babysat this this gorgeous Nepenthes veitchii at the club table.

Nepenthes veitchii Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes veitchii Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

Some of the best plants were on display out in the hallway.

Crazy huge Drosera regia!
Drosera regia. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

Love the spots on these Sarracenia minors.

Sarracenia table. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Heliamphora. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

The color contrast on these Nepenthes ampullaria! I’m in love.

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

I couldn’t get a wide enough shot of this massive bowl of Cephalotus follicularis, so I settled on making it look like a Ceph landscape.

Cephalotus. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Cephalotus. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

And the SHOW! Oh my goodness, the show!

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Drosera spiralis. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Utricularia. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Darlingtonia. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Darlingtonia. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

These red Nepenthes albomarginata were a personal favorite of mine. Such adorable pitchers.

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

This massive pot of Darlingtonia californica won first in Best in Show. Very well deserved!

Darlingtonia. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

My kind of planter for a Pinguicula gigantea!

Pinguicula gigantea. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Piranha plant. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes painting. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia table. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Sarracenia table. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Darlingtonia. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

Super adorable Genlisea lobata x flexuosa flower! I have this same hybrid and am suddenly super inspired to make it flower. The owner of this one had it flooded in a glass jar, so I may do something similar.

Genlisea. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

This little flytrap wasn’t my entry, but I’m super proud nonetheless! I gave it to a fellow BACPS member at one of our socials when it was a teeny tiny little thing. The traps were maybe a quarter inch long at the time. Clearly, she took amazing care of it and won second plants in the flytrap category!

Venus flytrap. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

Impressive stem on this Drosera capensis entry!

Drosera capensis. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

I just diagnosed myself with Pinguicula cyclosecta envy.

Pinguicula. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Pinguicula. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

 

Nepenthes klossii, one of the two side-opening Nepenthes species. I don’t think I’d seen an N. klossii in person before!

Nepenthes. Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Show and Sale 2016. By The Carnivore Girl

To say the show was carnivorous plant overload is an understatement, though that isn’t a bad thing! I’m super proud to be part of a group that gathers such amazing participation around this hobby.

I also have to shout out to the LOVELY blog readers, followers, and customers I was able to meet in person at the show. I mean, anyone can takes photos, write word-vomit and put it on the internet. But knowing that my photos and word-vomiting is really reaching, helping, and inspiring people to learn about and grow these plants is such an honor! It was truly wonderful meeting some of you. 🙂

As always, thank you for reading and checking out the photos! If you enjoyed them, please share this post via the buttons on the left. I’ll see you in the next post!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Venus flytraps in the full swing of Spring!

Hi, everyone! It’s been a little while since I’ve blogged. March was a fairly hectic month, but I’ve got lots on blog calendar for you in the coming months! 🙂

First up: Let’s check out the Venus flytraps! They’ve been putting out sweet traps for over a month already.

Fused Tooth is making typical-looking traps right now. In my experience, they fuse toward the end of the season.

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Those pink cilia, though!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Also feeding themselves for the first time in months, and biting off more than they can chew.

Fused Tooth Venus flytrap by The Carnivore Girl

Here’s the same plant last summer when I first got it:

Fused Tooth Venus flytrap by The Carnivore Girl

 

And last fall. Fully fused goodness!

Fused Tooth Venus flytrap by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s a pot of young typical flytraps putting out good growth and coloring up nicely!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s Bristletooth, just looking sexy!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s a freaky looking one, but can you believe it’s Justina Davis?? I know! These came out of tissue culture, which may have given it these freaky traits! Interesting how even cloned cultivars can look very different from each other.
Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Here’s one of my new favorites, FTS  Werewolf Spawn! I still intend on getting the original Werewolf one day, but right now I’m enjoying the hell out of this puppy (hehe!).
Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

FTS Maroon Monster is looking dark, sexy, and mean! I’m seriously considering entering this baby into the BACPS show this year.

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Speaking of sexy and mean, DC XL is looking that way too! This is still a young plant, and it’s making average adult sized traps already (about an inch or so long).

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

 

Pink Venus is my other most impressive looking all-red Venus flytrap lately! The all-red ones seem to grow a bit behind their greener siblings.

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

And lastly, FTS Crimson Sawtooth, my all-red pride and joy, is not far behind!

Venus flytraps by The Carnivore Girl

You may remember most of my flytraps suffering from a mite attack last summer, so I’m watching like a hawk for those bastards. The plants looking healthy and strong this year, so hopefully they stay that way!

Thanks a bunch for looking! I hope all your plants are looking great right now too. In the next blog post, I’ll have a ton of Sarracenia photos! Those came out of dormancy a bit later than the flytraps, and they’re finally opening for business and looking stellar.

Any questions or comments on the flytraps, please leave a comment below! Catch you all next time!

Mexican butterwort Pinguicula 'Weser' with flower stalk.

Signs of Spring + Special Announcement!

Spring is technically one month away, but my area is feeling her warmth and light right now. As of writing this, it’s a perfect 78 F outside!

These few weeks before the spring equinox for me is full of anticipation, an eager feeling of tension. It’s like watching a movie for that one big moment you don’t want to miss.

Read more

Learn how to treat mite damage on Venus flytraps

Sad & Ugly Plants? How to Spot & Treat Mites

As a fairly experienced grower of five years, it was embarrassing.

This past summer, my Venus flytraps weren’t thriving like they had the year before. In fact, they looked REALLY bad. I gave them a dose of a systemic insecticide that helped wiped out my mealybugs earlier this year (imidacloprid). No improvement.

When I had more dead leaves than live ones, I knew I had a problem I had to tackle fast.

This is what my plants looked like. 🙁

Learn how to treat mite damage on Venus flytraps

My once-gorgeous FTS Crimson Sawtooth looked like crap. 🙁

Learn how to treat mite damage on Venus flytraps

New traps were dying before fully developing! I wanted to cry.

Learn how to treat mite damage on Venus flytraps

Learn how to treat mite damage on Venus flytraps

 

From what I read in books and searched online, my best educated guess was spider mites as the culprit. I took photos of my damaged plants and posted in the FlytrapCare Forums to get feedback from other growers, and my suspicion was confirmed. I had pretty gnarly mite damage.

The bad news: Mites are tough, and many systemic insecticides don’t work on them. To truly take care of them, you specifically need a good miticide. And the best miticide on the market is expensive and comes in a huge quantity. 

This is where I really want to sing the praises of FlytrapCare.com. Their store offers small doses of miticide at an affordable price. They are all $19.95, so you might as well buy Avid, the best one.

This is the dose of Avid that I received. Yes, that tiny little bottle can create five gallons! More than enough for me!

Avid Miticide available in small doses!

As mentioned in the description, Avid is effective on mobile life stages of mites, but not on eggs. To best eradicate all life stages, apply once every three days, for a total of three applications. Avid is a toxic pesticide, so be sure to use proper protection and read the label when handling it, even in small doses! 

And, oh man! I saw my flytraps bounce back to life almost immediately! Check out these shots from last week!

Red Venus flytrap cultivars, click to see more!

Red Venus flytrap cultivars, click to see more!

The traps are alive! No more 90% dead leaves!

Red Venus flytrap cultivars, click to see more!

Red Venus flytrap cultivars, click to see more!

 

You can see some of the old damage on these typicals. I’m waiting for the whole leaf to die off before trimming!

Dionaea muscipula, Venus flytrap.

Dionaea muscipula, Venus flytrap.

So how do I know if I have mites? 

Mites tend to attack when the weather is hot and dry, which was definitely the case here in California! If you have damage that looks similar to mine, and hot, dry weather to match, chances are good that you have them. The mites themselves are very hard to see and nearly microscopic. They look like tiny red or white specks. Spider mites may also weave web-like structures around your plants.

I’m bummed that my flytraps aren’t as glorious-looking as last year, but this was definitely a valuable lesson! I know what to look for and can hopefully stop damage sooner next time! This is also my wake up call to take preventative action against pests during dormancy this year.

Final note: I don’t receive any kind of commission from Flytrapcare.com. I wanted to share what worked for me, and hopefully you guys will benefit from the info too!

If you did find this post helpful, please share it with the buttons to the left! Everyone should have the knowledge to treat plant damage at an affordable cost!

Thanks for reading! Til next time,

Maria

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

Special treat! Plants you’ve NEVER seen before + UJB!

Venus flytrap in a thrifted ceramic container. Click to see more!

Time for another special Urban Jungle Bloggers post! With this month’s theme, I took the opportunity to challenge myself and post some plants that haven’t appeared on this blog yet. You may have seen some of these on my Instagram if you follow (hint: you should!).

This month’s UJB theme was #plantcolorpop and what a challenge it was for me! I favor neutral, earthy colors in almost everything, from the backgrounds of my photos to my clothes. My favorite color is green, so I love bits of bright green here and there but overall I’m not a “color pop” type of person!  Still, I welcome a challenge!

For these colorful backgrounds, I used colored cardstock paper I had for making cards and crafting.

Utricularia nelumbifolia was by far my favorite plant with the blue background! This is an epiphytic utricularia from Brazil! Nelumbo is a genus of aquatic plants, most often known as lotuses. The blue really lends that aquatic, lotus-y feel!

Utricularia nelumbifolia, an epiphytic bladderwort with lotus-like leaves. It's also a carnivorous plant!

 

I also shot this typical Venus flytrap on the blue background, but I actually prefer it on the pink background! (Scroll back up to see the first image of this post) That is pretty shocking, as I’m NOT a girl who likes pink at all!

Venus flytrap in a thrifted ceramic container. Click to see more!

 

I liked the contrast between FTS Maroon Monster’s leaves and the greenish yellow background.

FTS Maroon Monster. A large, robust, red cultivar of Venus flytrap.

 

I like how this little flytrap really blends in with the background, but the planter it’s in stands out so strongly! (Psst: Win this plant + tons more in my latest giveaway! Click here!)

Venus flytrap in a thrifted ceramic container. Click to see more!

 

Some of the red Sarracenia looked really nice on a different green background! This one below is a young “Reptilian Rose” (Thanks, Rob!) You can see the hint of a pointy, funky lip on the right pitcher, but these divisions are still a bit small to display those crazy, reptilian traits! Maybe in another year or two, but I do love the red color they’ve become!

Young pitchers of Sarracenia "Reptilian Rose". North American pitcher plant hybrid.

Another young Sarracenia division diggin’ the minty green background! This one is “Lamentations” x  flava red.

Sarracenia flava red x "Lamentations". North American pitcher plant hybrid.

 

FTS Crimson Sawtooth, you are beautiful against any background color. Be still, my heart!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. A red cultivar of Venus Flytrap with short, jagged teeth. Click to see more!

 

I was genuinely surprised at how many plants actually looked really good against the pink background! Here’s Utricularia livida! You can see the shape of the flower very nicely against the color pop.

Utricularia livida. A carnivorous bladderwort with tiny, delicate flowers. Click to see more!

Utricularia livida. A carnivorous bladderwort with tiny, delicate flowers. Click to see more!

And last but not least, here’s a shot of my smallest Sarracenia “Hummer’s Hammerhead”! I don’t think I’ve shown these guys on the blog since I first got them, and they were all headless. They’ve come a long way since then!

Sarracenia "Hummer's Hammerhead". A North American pitcher plant hybrid.

Thank you for checking out this #plantcolorpop challenge! I hope you enjoyed it. 🙂

Check out the Urban Jungle Blogger community here! Also check out the lovely founders, Judith and Igor.

Which color background did you like best? Let me know in a comment!

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

What has 8 legs and is totally delicious? These flytraps will tell you!

Lately I’ve noticed my Venus flytraps catching a lot more spiders than they usually do. The spiders are probably coming in droves thanks to the increase in flies, which (I think) is due to the increase in dog crap sitting on the lawn. Thanks, new neighbors!

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

 

What’s interesting is this trap pictured below re-opened and is ready for business again after eating and digesting this spider. Usually, spider legs hanging out of a trap prevents the trap edges from sealing, meaning the leaf can’t release its digestive juices in order to consume the spider. This usually means the trap leaf will start dying soon after capturing a spider or something else with appendages sticking out.

This is why when hand-feeding your plants, use food that’s 1/3 the size of the trap or smaller. Read my feeding guide to learn more!

Hence why I’m not thrilled about so many spiders being eaten. They make my traps die! But this one looks like it was still able to seal up and do it’s thang with its victim’s final gesture of escape forever immortalized (aren’t I poetic today?).

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

Venus flytrap devouring spiders!

 

Enough gruesome photos for ya? Here are some pretty photos to balance them out! I haven’t shown the all-red Dionaea cultivars in a little while, so check them out below!

Red Venus flytrap cultivar Red Piranha
Dionaea Muscipula “Red Piranha”

 

Red Venus flytrap cultivars Crimson Sawtooth and Pink Venus

I love the juxtaposition of long, eyelashy cilia of Pink Venus next to the short, serrated edges of Crimson Sawtooth (dang, I am on it with the big words today!).

Red Venus flytrap cultivars Red Piranha and Pink Venus

 

I’m ending this post with this photo because I just find the form on this developing leaf so lovely, pure, and flawless. Kind of like a newborn baby! Over time, it’s going to grow up, get marked up and scarred, eat like a king, suffer, and slowly die. But in this moment, it’s just so pure and untouched.

The simple beauty of a Venus flytrap leaf forming

I really have idea why I’m so poetic and sappy in this post today, haha. I’m rushing a bit, so maybe it just comes out of me when under pressure!

Can you believe we’re almost in June already? What’s even better is June is my birthday month! What better time for an amazing new GIVEAWAY? I’m planning it out right now, so enter your email below to get all the details first when it’s live!

Maybe my subconscious realized I’m getting older, and that’s why I’m acting weird. Hah!

Beware of Plant Gangsters and their Plant Gangs!

I don’t normally post Thursdays, but today is special! With this post, I’m participating in the Urban Jungle Bloggers community! Every month, UJB bloggers post their interpretation of a theme, and this month’s theme is Plant Gang! How can it get anymore badass and gangster when you gather a bunch of carnivorous plants together?

Here’s one of my gangs! These are all my flytraps in tea cup/ceramic container experiments! You may recognize a few!

Urban Jungle Bloggers Theme May 2015: Plant Gang

 

The mini teacups are the most darling things. I’m sure they were meant for a doll set. I’m experimenting to see how my tiniest Venus flytrap division fair in those. Two are still a bit cranky about it, but one of them digs it!

Baby carnivorous plants in mini tea cup planters. Click for more info!

 

Yep, that’s a Utricularia livida in one of them too. It’s put out two flowers and is loving the tiny tea cup life!

Utricularia livida. Carnivorous bladderwort potted in a mini tea cup. Click to find out more!

 

My gang of my favorite Utricularia! U. blanchetti and and sandersonii have really taken off since I first planted them in tea cups back in November!

Carnivorous bladderworts potted in tea cups make great house plants! Click to find out more!

And of course, I can’t post about a plant gang without the creepy adorableness (or adorable creepiness?) of my doll head planters!

Carnivorous sundew plants in doll head planters. Cute and just a touch of creepy!

The little guy on the right was my first one. Can you tell by how whitened out he is from the sun? Look how much that Drosera. binata has grown! The middle one is my most recent brain surgery patient, planted with Drosera collinsiae, hamiltonii, and coccicaulis “Alba”. All three are my most recent acquisitions from Predatory Plants. (Psst: save 10% on your order from PP when you enter “thecarnivoregirl” at checkout!) This reminds me that I REALLY need to update my dang grow list!

The little dollhead family gang is expanding soon! Some of you may have seen this teaser I posted on Instagram!

Use doll heads as unique planters! Click for more info.

Oh yes, clown gangs! What is the world coming to? 🙂

Onto another plant gang! These are my divisions from my Sarracenia Judith Hindle x flava var. atropurpurea and flava var. cuprea! They’re in individual pots that I keep in one big water tray.

Divisions of Sarracenia, carnivorous pitcher plants. Some of these pitchers are getting just as big, if not bigger than the mother plant! I’ll be sending some off to new homes soon! Enter your email below if you want to be notified when I’ll have plants for sale!

And finally, I want to share a moment with you SO GANGSTER, I could hardly believe it.

Pygmy sundews are usually clustered together in little blinged out mini-gangs. My Drosera omissa x pulchella are no different… except that this little gang brought down a mother-freaking CRANE FLY!

Tiny but powerful! Pygmy sundews feast on a Crane Fly !

I swear on my space bucket that I did not put that crane fly there! These little guys took it down all by themselves!

Tiny but powerful! Pygmy sundews feast on a Crane Fly !

And just to be extra badass, they’re also flowering while feasting on some crane fly.

Tiny, carnivorous pygmy sundews Drosera omissa x pulchella flowering and feasting on a crane fly!

I know you all got some gangster-ass carnivorous plants out there! What’s the biggest, most surprising prey your plants have taken down? Let me know in a comment!

And if my fellow bloggers are looking for inspiration, I highly encourage you to check out Urban Jungle Bloggers! There are some awesome growers in the community and the monthly prompts are super fun! In my opinion, all they need are more carnivorous plants. 😉

Check out the founders of UJB, Igor: Happy Interior Blog and Judith: JOELIX.com and soak in the plant and design eye candy!

Venus flytrap cultivar Giant Clam.

Rare Cultivars & Fun Times at California Carnivores Nursery!

California Carnivores is just close enough to me, yet just far away that I have visited the nursery merely three times in nearly six years of growing carnivorous plants. My most recent visit (last Saturday) was special! I got to see Chi’en Lee speak and present his wildlife photography while living in and exploring remote areas of Borneo, The Philippines, Papua New Guinea and more!

Chi'en Lee presenting at California Carnivores

It was a truly entrancing and educational presentation! Even my not-super-enthusiastic-about-weird-plants husband really enjoyed it. Aside from the stunning photos and funny stories, the amount of biodiversity packed into such a small area was astonishing. You can essentially go for a leisurely stroll in the rain forest and it would unusual to not see any new species of something! Whether animal, mineral, or vegetable, there is still so much that is unknown. Chi’en showed several photos of a newly discovered, unnamed species of Nepenthes. Super exciting!

Unfortunately, I was late to the presentation due to bad traffic, and couldn’t get a decent seat until later. AND I didn’t bring my telephoto lens, doh. My one decent shot is above. Most of my shots came out like this:

Chi'en Lee presenting at California Carnivores

Nice shot of the Nepenthes pitcher though, right?

California Carnivores was also having a 20% off sale all day, so I had to shop around after the presentation and mingle with my fellow plant nerds. I met the awesome Sarracenia Dude, finally! We literally saw each other and were like “OMG, Hiiiiiiii!” 😀

I also got to finally meet the lovely Kate Halpin, who’s relocated to the west (best) coast to work at the nursery! So happy you’re here, Kate! 😀 I proudly rocked my butterwort tote bag that she created. 

Devon of Sundews Etc. and I caught up and shot the shit since the last meetup. We also got a private tour of California Carnivores’ propagation areas (thanks again, Daniela!) and saw some not-yet-available Venus flytrap cultivars!

Just one part of the propagation area. Gotta love the high-tech kiddie pools!

California Carnivores propagation area

 

Check out “Werewolf”! This is one I want SO BAD! As far as I know, it’s not available for sale in the US anywhere.

Venus flytrap werewolf cultivar

 

“Giant Clam” with a large, deeply red trap and fringed cilia. Super cool looking!

Venus flytrap cultivar Giant Clam.

 

I believe this one was unnamed, but check out those jagged cilia and red stripe on the side!

Venus flytrap cultivar.

 

It’s hard to get a sense of the size in this photo, but this is the one and only DC XL! Turns out sticking my fingers in the shot doesn’t help. But I never got a sense of the massive size of this cultivar until seeing it in person. This trap was probably as long as my index finger!

Venus Flytrap DC XL cultivar.

 

I imagine the California Carnivores’ staff wouldn’t be too happy with me if I stuck Werewolf or DC XL in my pocket, so here’s what I did come home with!

Pinguicula moranesis J, which I repotted into a Japanese-styled teacup.

Pinguicula moranensis J in a small, Japanese style tea cup.

 

Dionaea muscipula “Fused Tooth”. None of the cilia have fused yet, but I can’t wait to see that later in the season!

dionaea-muscipula-venus-flytrap-fused-tooth (1 of 1)

 

Sarracenia oreophila “Sand Mountain” x leucophylla “Schnell’s Ghost”. I was debating between various red hybrids and almost didn’t see this one. I really like how subtle it is, and looks like it has potentially for some funky lips too!

sarracenia-oreophila-leucophylla-schnells-ghost (1 of 1)

 

And finally Drosera capensis “narrow red leaf.” Two plants  in one pot, plus plenty of Utricularia bisquamata, score! Bonus plants are the best plants. I’ve also been wanting a red or albino capensis for a while to contrast with my typical forms!

sundew-drosera-capensis-narrow-red (1 of 1)

 

Thanks for reading! Saturday was a really great day, and I’m so glad I got to meet other plant folks in person that I previously only knew on the internet!

Were you there for presentation? What did you think and what plants did you get? Leave me your comments! And let’s meet at the next event if we didn’t get to this time! 😀

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. An all-red Venus flytrap cultivar with short, jagged, cilia.

Venus Flytrap Cultivars (The red, the pretty, and the bristled!)

Now that we are well out of dormancy, I’d like to show off some of my Venus flytrap cultivars! I only really showed these off when I first got them at the beginning of dormancy, but now they’re growing super nicely!

You may have seen some shots of my FTS Maroon Monster on InstagramIt was a nice size when I first got it, but now this thing really is becoming a monster! Here is a shot from March 8th, a couple weeks ago.

FTS Maroon Monster, an all-red large, vigorous Venus Flytrap cultivar.

This huge trap was shot on March 20th! It’s already twice the size of other traps!

FTS Maroon Monster, an all-red large, vigorous Venus Flytrap cultivar.

FTS Maroon Monster, an all-red large, vigorous Venus Flytrap cultivar.

 

Here it is one day later on March 21st! The cilia are already uncurling and breaking free!

FTS Maroon Monster, an all-red large, vigorous Venus Flytrap cultivar.

 

FTS Crimson Sawtooth has made some pretty attractive traps! I love the Maroon Monster for its robustness and size (teehee) but this is probably my favorite all-red Venus flytrap cultivar. Its traps are just so beautiful and distinct. It also has really neat, rosetted growth.

FTS Crimson Sawtooth. An all-red Venus flytrap cultivar with short, jagged, cilia.

 

Pink is looking pretty too with those cilia! It’s got a tiny little flower stalk forming too. Hmm, maybe I should think of some red Venus Flytrap crosses!

"Pink" all-red Venus Flytrap cultivar.

 

Here’s a cute little Red Piranha, contrasting nicely against a layer of sand, in front of two other Red Piranha divisions!

"Red Piranha" is a red Venus flytrap cultivar with short, jagged teeth.

 

Moving away from red Venus flytraps now, here’s Coquillage!

Coquillage is a Venus flytrap cultivar with extremely short, to nonexistent "teeth" or cilia. Coquillage means "shell" in French.

 

I am loving the jagged fringe here on Bristletooth!

Bristletooth is a Venus Flytrap cultivar with short, bristled "teeth" or cilia.

 

And finally, BZ Razorback looks very similar to Bristletooth, but has an interesting, patchy pattern of red inside of some of the new traps!

BZ Razorback is a Venus Flytrap cultivar with short, bristled "teeth" or cilia. It was originally grown from seed by veteran carnivorous plant grower, Bob Ziemer.

Can you tell I like all-red flytraps and short cilia? Just making sure. 😉 While lately I have gotten into more into Sarracenia and Utricularia, I will always have a special love for Dionaea. My next carnivorous plant purchase will likely be more Venus flytrap cultivars, since that’s about all I have room for! I really want Korean Melody Shark, Microdent, and of course, Angel Wings!

How are your Venus flytraps doing? What are your favorite cultivars that you own or want? Are you going to try getting seeds this year? Talk to me in a comment! 😀

Typical Venus flytraps (Dionaea muscipula) show lots of genetic diversity.

The Great (and final!) Dividing: Big Ol’ Venus Flytrap Pot

Dividing up my adult typical Venus flytrap pot marks my last major repotting project for the year! To recap, first was the two-day task of dividing my biggest Sarracenia pot, then the much easier all-red Venus fly trap pot. I think this last flytrap pot and the Sarracenia dividing tied for the hardest. I didn’t take two days with this last one, but I was hot, sweaty and had way more plants than I anticipated! Enough pillow talk now, onto the photos!

This was the last shot of the pot before I divided it up. Several of the trap leaves were new growth and triggered immediately. That’s what I get for putting off repotting this for so long!

Typical Venus flytraps (Dionaea muscipula) show lots of genetic diversity.

The whole thing, unpotted!

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

 

I started pulling away chunks of soil and this was the first plant section I pulled away. There are at least five separate plants in here that I can see!

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

 

Yep, looks like five divisions!

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

 

I think this is the entire pot up-rooted. I lost track of time and plants around here!

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

 

Soaking in bath before going to new pots and homes!

Soak your Venus flytrap roots in distilled water before repotting or shipping bare root.

 

A good portion of these babies went to the winners of my Venus flytrap giveaway (I definitely stuck more than five plants in every bag!). I also wrote a tutorial on how to ship bare root plants. Click here to read itIt’s definitely useful information if you ever reach the point of trading, giving away, or selling any of your plants!

Put bare root plants in a ziplock bag to seal in moisture when shipping them. Click for more info!

 

Two of my biggest rhizomes! While I gave away several large ones, I saw these and just couldn’t part with them. I’ve got to hold onto my breeding stock, right?

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. A firm, white rhizome is a sign of a healthy plant. Click for more info!

 

I packaged all the plants I was sending out before potting my own stock. Check out this post for step-by-step photos of packaging bare root plants for shipping. By the time I got to potting my own, I was already exhausted, so these look less than pretty! I ran out of plastic pots, so a couple went in the plastic drinking cups. Those two were given to friends/coworkers. I chose my four biggest rhizomes and planted them in the original square pot after cleaning it. It’ll be interesting to see how many plants they divide into again! A few others went into some ceramic pieces I thrifted and drilled drainage holes into. An experiment of sorts!

We’ll see how everything looks in a few weeks. 🙂

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

I am SO glad to be done with my three major repotting projects until next dormancy! I still have little things to do here and there, but now it’s time to sit back and enjoy the growing season! 😀

Have you done all of your repotting already? If not, how much more do you plan to do? Let me know in a comment!

Oh yeah, and don’t be bummed if you missed out on the free Venus flytraps! I have (at least!) two more awesome giveaways coming up! Look for the next one around the spring equinox! Better yet, enter your email below to get first dibs on giveaways and other awesome carnivorous plant stuff!

Red Piranha Venus fly trap

The Red Venus Fly Trap Pot (Great Dividing Part 2)

For the last year, I’ve had my red Venus Flytraps all in separate pots. Since I’ve been running into space issues, I decided consolidate them into one pot. This was much easier to accomplish than my great Sarracenia repotting back in December! Red Venus fly traps tend to be smaller and slower growing than their greener cousins, so I did not have nearly as many divisions to pot up!

Going into this pot were the cultivars “Red Dragon”, “Pink Venus”, “FTS Crimson Sawtooth”, and “Red Piranha”, pictured below. I only did not include “FTS Maroon Monster” as that one is already big and vigorous enough that it will overwhelm the pot by end of the season!

Red Piranha Venus fly trap
Red Piranha in its old pot.

I love the moment after pulling away the old media and revealing a gorgeous, healthy white rhizome underneath the soil!

Venus flytrap rhizome

When repotting dormant plants, there is often a bunch of dead material still attached to the plant. Now is a good time to trim it all off!

Venus flytrap rhizome with dead growth. Make sure to trim off the dead stuff!

This Red Piranha ended up being three little divisions in one clump!

Venus flytrap Red Piranha divisions.

More gorgeous, healthy rhizomes! “Red Dragon” and “Pink Venus” were in the same pot together. “Pink” wins the longest root contest by less than an inch!

Red Dragon Venus Flytrap and Pink Venus

Just one more pretty rhizome shot because I seriously can’t get enough!

FTS Crimson Sawtooth all-read Venus Flytrap

Everybody took a bath in distilled water while I prepped the media for their new home!

Venus flytraps need distilled water, full sun, and inert soil with no fertilizers.

I used my good ol’ reliable 50/50 peat moss and perlite mix and topped with a thin layer of horticultural sand. After seeing a couple other growers do this, I’ll never go back! The sand looks so much nicer and will help to prevent fungus and algae growth which can overwhelm small plants. I also think the dark red traps will contrast very nicely against the light sand once they get growing!

Red Venus fly trap pot

Red Venus fly traps

My next big repotting project will be all my typical Venus flytraps, and that will definitely involve multiple pots and many plants going to new homes! I’m in planning stages of an epic giveaway right now! Enter your email below to get the details first!

Drosera omissa x pulchella. Pygmy sundews are easiest to propagate through gemmae, which act like seeds but are reproductive bodies that create clones of the plant.

2014 Year in Review: Carnivorous Plant Edition

Happy soon-to-be New Year! 2014 was pretty special to me, as far as carnivorous plant care goes! I started this hobby in 2009, but my passion for carnivores was truly reignited this year! So much so that I started this blog, got involved in the online carnivorous plant community again, and bought some new plants that I’ve never grown before! It’s been a wonderful, humbling learning experience and I’m really looking forward to new adventures in 2015!

In this post, I’ll briefly go over the past year and some of the highlights. LOTS of photos ahead! Take a trip down memory lane with me!

February 

I did a major re-potting of all my typical Venus flytraps in mid-February.

Bare root Venus Flytraps getting ready to be repotted!
Soaking in a tray of distilled water, getting a nice bath before going in a new pot!

 

The beautiful white rhizome of a Venus Flytrap
Sexy rhizomes make me swoon.

 

The beautiful white rhizome of a Venus Flytrap

March/April

I did not put the Sarracenia in a new pot this year. As spring sprung, the first new growths appeared!

Dionaea Muscipula (Venus Flytrap)
Nice red color on a new flytrap!
Sarracenia Flava "Cuprea" pitchers almost opening!
Sarracenia Flava “Cuprea” pitchers almost opening!
Sarracenia Flava "Cuprea" pitchers open for business!
And the pitchers fully open and developed!
Awesome pitcher plant hybrid! Sarracenia Oreophilia x Purpurea ssp.
First pitcher on Sarracenia Oreophilia x Purpurea ssp.

In April, I also took my second ever trip to the California Carnivores Nursery!

Sun Pitcher Plants (heliamphora) at California Carnivores.
Just a quick shot of the gorgeous Heliamphora. No I didn’t bring any home. 🙁

And brought home this sweet little Dionaea “Red Piranha”!

Dionaea Muscipula "Red Piranha"

May/June/July

Basically, everything is growing and looking awesome! I even saw my first two-headed deformed flytrap!

Two headed Venus Flytrap! These deformities happen sometimes.

"Crimson Sawtooth" Venus flytrap. A gorgeous cultivar!
My favorite shot of my FTS Crimson Sawtooth
Typical Venus flytraps display lots of different traits!
The adult typical Dionaea pot bursting with life!

Gorgeous veins on a Sarracenia (American pitcher plant) hybrid.

Below are a pot of Sarracenia seedlings I ordered from Cook’s Carnivores. Read my review here!

Hybrid Sarracenia seedlings

 

Just for fun, here is the same plant in November!

Very interesting hybrid Sarracenia seedling!

Now back to summer fun in the sun!

Sarracenia mixed variety mini bog
The Sarracenia getting too big for their britches!

 

I got my first ever Cephalotus in my Cook’s order! I was nervous about getting it, but it’s been doing quite well!

Cephalotus Follicularis, the Australian pitcher plant. Sought after by carnivorous plant collectors everywhere!

August

On August 18th, I published my first blog post

Carnivorous plants often enjoy the outdoors all year round!
Life is good in Carnivore Girl Land.

September

Just before the dormancy season, I expanded my collection quite a bit more!

Coquillage. A delicate, small, and lovely Venus Flytrap Cultivar.
Coquillage
DIonaea Muscipula "Bristletooth". A flytrap with bristled cilia on the trap edges.
Bristletooth
Maroon Monster Venus Flytrap. A large, vigorous, all-red flytrap!
My first FTS Maroon Monster!
Pinguicula Esseriana. A Mexican Butterwort Carnivorous Plant
My first ping! P. esseriana!

My first Venus flytrap seeds also germinated! See my latest seedling update here!

Growing Venus flytraps from seeds is a lengthy process, but so rewarding!

October

And in October, my collection grew just a bit more…

Sarracenia pitchers are often trimmed for dormancy.
You can’t tell now, but they’re Sarracenia x “Hummer’s Hammerhead”!

 

At first there was one ping, then six more were added! Check out my post Adventures in growing butterworts!

Mexican butterworts (pinguicula) are some of the prettiest carnivorous plants.
More pings!

The fall colors also started coming in…

Many American pitcher plants (Sarracenia) create autumn leaves in gorgeous colors!

Venus flytraps can also make interesting colors in the autumn season!

November

Dormancy settled in, California got some pretty heavy rain, and I got my first Utricularia (bladderworts)!

Dormant Venus Flytraps often hug the ground and turn dark, intense colors.

Sarracenia (American Pitcher Plants) all require a cold dormancy. They're very tolerant of cold weather!

Check out when I first planted the utrics in tea cups here!

Tea cups make great little planters for terrestrial bladderworts!

 

 December

My Utricularia made new flowers, despite the cold weather! I also separated out my big Sarracenia pot, and got my first gemmae! I will post about the latter two projects very soon!

Utricularia Blanchetii flower. Tiny, delicate carnivorous plants with beautiful flowers that rival orchids!
Utricularia Blanchetii flower

 

Sarracenia flava "Cuprea" mother plant and divisions
Sarracenia flava “Cuprea” mother plant and divisions
Drosera omissa x pulchella. Pygmy sundews are easiest to propagate through gemmae, which act like seeds but are reproductive bodies that create clones of the plant.
Drosera omissa x pulchella gemmae. My first pygmy drosera!

Can’t forget the other sundews, keeping warm and cozy in the little greenhouse!

The Cape Sundew is one of the easiest carnivorous plants to grow! Click through for more info.
Drosera capensis

Below is Drosera venusta, one of my favorite new additions this year from Predatory Plants. Hard to decide if this one or the pygmies will become my favorite sundew in my collection!

Drosera Venusta, a south African sundew and a stunning carnivorous plant!

 

I glazed over a lot, but that about sums up my year of carnivorous plants! Lots of firsts and learning experiences for me. 😀 Tell me all about your year! What was the highlight, if you can name just one?

There is so much more I want to try and do and see next year… it will have to be its own post! Farewell, 2014! See you all in the new year!