The Great (and final!) Dividing: Big Ol’ Venus Flytrap Pot

Dividing up my adult typical Venus flytrap pot marks my last major repotting project for the year! To recap, first was the two-day task of dividing my biggest Sarracenia pot, then the much easier all-red Venus fly trap pot. I think this last flytrap pot and the Sarracenia dividing tied for the hardest. I didn’t take two days with this last one, but I was hot, sweaty and had way more plants than I anticipated! Enough pillow talk now, onto the photos!

This was the last shot of the pot before I divided it up. Several of the trap leaves were new growth and triggered immediately. That’s what I get for putting off repotting this for so long!

Typical Venus flytraps (Dionaea muscipula) show lots of genetic diversity.

The whole thing, unpotted!

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

 

I started pulling away chunks of soil and this was the first plant section I pulled away. There are at least five separate plants in here that I can see!

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

 

Yep, looks like five divisions!

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

 

I think this is the entire pot up-rooted. I lost track of time and plants around here!

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

 

Soaking in bath before going to new pots and homes!

Soak your Venus flytrap roots in distilled water before repotting or shipping bare root.

 

A good portion of these babies went to the winners of my Venus flytrap giveaway (I definitely stuck more than five plants in every bag!). I also wrote a tutorial on how to ship bare root plants. Click here to read itIt’s definitely useful information if you ever reach the point of trading, giving away, or selling any of your plants!

Put bare root plants in a ziplock bag to seal in moisture when shipping them. Click for more info!

 

Two of my biggest rhizomes! While I gave away several large ones, I saw these and just couldn’t part with them. I’ve got to hold onto my breeding stock, right?

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. A firm, white rhizome is a sign of a healthy plant. Click for more info!

 

I packaged all the plants I was sending out before potting my own stock. Check out this post for step-by-step photos of packaging bare root plants for shipping. By the time I got to potting my own, I was already exhausted, so these look less than pretty! I ran out of plastic pots, so a couple went in the plastic drinking cups. Those two were given to friends/coworkers. I chose my four biggest rhizomes and planted them in the original square pot after cleaning it. It’ll be interesting to see how many plants they divide into again! A few others went into some ceramic pieces I thrifted and drilled drainage holes into. An experiment of sorts!

We’ll see how everything looks in a few weeks. 🙂

Repotting Venus flytraps should be done at least every other year. Click for more info!

I am SO glad to be done with my three major repotting projects until next dormancy! I still have little things to do here and there, but now it’s time to sit back and enjoy the growing season! 😀

Have you done all of your repotting already? If not, how much more do you plan to do? Let me know in a comment!

Oh yeah, and don’t be bummed if you missed out on the free Venus flytraps! I have (at least!) two more awesome giveaways coming up! Look for the next one around the spring equinox! Better yet, enter your email below to get first dibs on giveaways and other awesome carnivorous plant stuff!

2 comments

  1. Megan says:

    Golly!!!! That previous pot of flytraps was packed! Nice job on the repotting haha!!!
    I wasn’t planning on doing repotting this spring since I did a lot before dormancy, but I’m a little upset with the perlite I used in all my repot medium (it makes this ugly orange fungus), so I bought a 100lb bag of silica sand and pumice and I am going to slowly but surely repot all plants that have fungus growth! Already started but there’s so many plants!!! (Sufficient to say that they’re all barely barely coming out of dormancy so I still have a good few weeks)

    • Maria says:

      Thanks, Megan! It was definitely a big undertaking. I’m glad it’s over! 😀 Sorry to hear that about your perlite! That sucks. Silica will definitely do the job though. 😀

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